Avocados are a double-whammy to belly fat. First, they’re packed with heart-healthy monounsaturated fats that dim your hunger switches; a study in Nutrition Journal found that participants who ate half a fresh avocado with lunch reported a 40 percent decreased desire to eat for hours afterwards. Second, healthy fats like the unsaturated fats found in avocados seem to prevent the storage of belly fat.


Here's something else most people probably don't know: Fidgeting is good for you. It's considered a nonexercise physical activity, and it's an important way to burn energy. You get more health benefits if, in addition to exercising, you are a more fidgety, more active person the rest of the day. This means gesturing while you're talking, tapping your foot, just moving around.
Our increasingly slothful lifestyles are partly to blame for skyrocketing obesity rates, so it’s no surprise that being more active is a simple fix for belly fat. In 2003, a first-of-its-kind study from Duke University showed that sedentary adults accumulated abdominal fat surprisingly quickly — and that sedentary women stacked on fat more visceral fat than sedentary men, even though they added less fat overall.
Why do people get different results with this diet plan? Medical conditions can play a big role in weight gain or loss. It is important to understand any medical conditions you may have before going on a diet. Many different issues can lead to abnormal weight gain, including thyroid issues. If this is a concern for you, read this article on hypothyroidism and its effect on weight. Mental health issues can also lead to weight gain or loss. If you struggle with anxiety, you may experience abnormal weight gain. Make sure to ask your doctor for advice about how to manage the anxiety without over-eating.
“A healthy weight is incredibly important in our overall health," says Shirin Badrtalei-Shah, DO, MPH, a physician at Kaiser Permamente in Southern California. "Being overweight and making poor food choices affects us in many different ways. It plays a role in our overall mood, how well we can focus and concentrate, our sleep and our energy level."
Your body needs a certain amount of essential vitamins and minerals to function properly. What happens when you don’t get enough of them? What happens when you eat too little food, or when the food you eat isn’t sufficiently nutritious? Perhaps our bodies catch on and reply by increasing hunger levels. After all – if we eat more, we increase the chances of consuming enough of whatever nutrient we are lacking.

The trick here is not only to avoid all obvious sources of carbohydrate (sweets, bread, spaghetti, rice, potatoes), but also to be careful with your protein intake. If you eat large amounts of meat, eggs and the like, the excess protein will be converted into glucose in your body. Large amounts of protein can also raise your insulin levels somewhat. This compromises optimal ketosis.
Get FIT involves three workouts and one luncheon seminar each week. The workouts, which are conducted in Bellmont Hall and offered throughout the day, are a balanced mix between cardiovascular and resistance training, the goal being to maximize weight loss from fat and improve daily functioning. The weekly luncheon is a one hour seminar where Get FIT participants bring their lunch and learn from a Registered Dietician and behavioral specialist about healthy eating habits and factors influencing consistent exercise habits, such as barriers and common myths. Get FIT also includes before and after DXA Body Composition tests allowing each participant to see changes in fat, muscle, and bone (see Body Comp FIT).
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