Cortisone as an oral drug is another common culprit (e.g. Prednisolone). Cortisone often causes weight gain in the long run, especially at higher doses (e.g. more than 5 mg Prednisolone per day). Unfortunately, cortisone is often an essential medication for those who are prescribed it, but the dose should be adjusted frequently so you don’t take more than you need. Asthma inhalers and other local cortisone treatments, like creams or nose sprays, hardly affect weight.

Although eating candy and drinking alcohol can potentially deter your weight loss goals, you won't have to swear these treats off for good. In fact, according to Clark, you can absolutely still expect to lose weight fast without giving up your favorite indulgences. “I personally eat dark chocolate almost every day, if not daily!” she says. “I drink wine at least once or twice a week.”


"When we’re lacking in sleep, our body’s hormones get thrown off balance which can impact our hunger levels the next day. We all have two hormones that affect our appetite: ghrelin and leptin. When we don’t get enough sleep, our ghrelin levels (the hormone that makes us feel hungry) rise, and our leptin levels (the hormone that makes us feel full) drop. This means that when we’re awake, we tend to eat more but feel less satisfied. Try going to bed a little earlier than usual to avoid this imbalance and remember to remove any distractions that might prevent you from nodding off."
After the long winter, it’s nice to have the getfit program to give me the momentum to be more active. The support of the getfit network helps me to be more mindful and more conscious, and the discounts and perks are wonderful incentives. The support does not end when you leave campus—getfit links to an array of fitness programs both on campus and in the community. Meeting new people while taking a power walk around the Charles, through the tunnels, or in after-work activities is an added bonus.
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