Carbohydrates are a touchy subject: while some blame them for all fat gain, it’s the type of carbs you eat that’s key. A 2011 study out of the University of Alabama found that a diet that slightly cut back on carbs, and which comprised mostly low-GI carbohydrates, lost more deep abdominal fat than those who ate a lower-fat diet. GI stands for glycemic index, a measure of how fast carbohydrates supply your body with energy: high-GI foods make you spike then crash, while low-GI foods provide a slow burn.
Visceral fat, commonly known as belly fat, is the layer of fat below the muscles of your abdomen. Due to its crucial location surrounding many of your vital organs, belly fat supplies a constant source of energy but also exposes the body to harmful toxins and hormones. When you have too many fat cells or your fat cells get too large, they can overproduce toxins that increase your risk for chronic inflammation, diabetes, heart disease and cancer. This is why belly fat can be more dangerous than subcutaneous fat—or the outer layer of fat that you can pinch with your fingers. That said, the reason you're having trouble buttoning your pants may not be visceral fat: what we're calling "belly fat" these days could be bloating or water retention rather than a fat buildup. Read on for steps you can take to beat the bulge.
Although everyone's body is different, Clark recommends making a timeline for yourself to encourage yourself to lose weight fast. Setting an end date to reach your ideal weight is a great way to motivate yourself to stick to a healthy eating plan. It will also help you stay on track when you're tempted to dig into a calorie-laden dessert on date night.
The plan includes four workouts a week, with two rest days. You can swap the rest days if you need to, but make sure you do have two days without exercise: they are there to maximise the results of your training. If you are unsure about whether to start physical activity, please ask your GP for advice first. And if you feel unwell, dizzy or in pain when performing these exercises, stop immediately.
Get FIT consists of Start FIT, Get FIT I, and Get FIT II.  Most individuals start in Get FIT I.  Start FIT is designed for those with more physical limitations.  Get FIT II is designed for those who have graduated from Get FIT I or are already physically active.  The FIT staff will help you determine if Start FIT, Get FIT I, Get FIT II is right for you.
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