What should you eat after working out? Exercise is beneficial for overall health. To get the most effective exercise, it is necessary to have good nutrition. There is a range of things to eat right after a workout that will help in specific fitness goals. It is also essential to eat to recover energy levels. Learn more about what to eat after a workout. Read now
Earlier, belly fat was considered healthy; it was perceived as a reservoir of adipose tissues that could be utilized when a person needed extra energy. With time, the views have changed. Researchers state that excess belly fat triggers chronic cardiovascular diseases. So, it is important to measure belly fat and check how much you need to reduce. Here are some parameters to measure your waistline.
Tight deadlines, bills, your kids—whatever your source of stress, having too much of it may make it harder for you to drop unwanted pounds, especially from your middle. And it's not just because you tend to reach for high-fat, high-calorie fare when you're stressed, though that's part of it. It's also due to the stress hormone cortisol, which may increase the amount of fat your body clings to and enlarge your fat cells. Higher levels of cortisol have been linked to more visceral fat.
The scale is not necessarily your friend. You may want to lose fat – but the scale measures muscles, bone and internal organs as well. Gaining muscle is a good thing. Thus weight or BMI are imperfect ways to measure your progress. This is especially true if you’re just coming off a long period of semi-starvation (calorie counting), as your body may want to restore lost muscles etc. Starting weight training and gaining muscle can also hide your fat loss.
If you want to lose weight fast, your best bet is the HMR Program, according to the health experts who rated the diets below for U.S. News. While these diets enable quick weight loss for those with a short-term goal – there's a strong chance you'll drop significant weight within the first 12 months – keep in mind that this is markedly different from long-term weight loss, which is more important for your health.
One of the most effective ways to torch calories at the gym is by incorporating HIIT workouts into your regular exercise routine. Researchers from the University of New South Wales recently discovered that women who performed three HIIT sessions per week lost roughly 7 pounds in a 15-week period, while participants in the same study who did lower intensity workouts actually gained almost 3 pounds.
Want to lose that belly fat? In your dreams! Seriously, though: a good night’s sleep is one of the best ways to get rid of that extra fat around your waist for good. Among the 60,000 women participating in the Nurses’ Health Study, those who snoozed for fewer than five hours a night were at the greatest risk of becoming obese and gaining 30 or more pounds over the course of the 16-year study period when compared to those who slept for seven or more hours.
Eat foods with a low glycemic index. These are foods that take longer for your body to digest and convert into energy, so you will feel fuller throughout the day with a smaller number of calories. Moreover, you avoid the "sugar rush" that comes as a result of eating foods with a high glycemic index, getting a nice boost of sustained energy throughout the day instead. This will keep you uplifted whether you're doing work or exercising.

Get FIT involves three workouts and one luncheon seminar each week. The workouts, which are conducted in Bellmont Hall and offered throughout the day, are a balanced mix between cardiovascular and resistance training, the goal being to maximize weight loss from fat and improve daily functioning. The weekly luncheon is a one hour seminar where Get FIT participants bring their lunch and learn from a Registered Dietician and behavioral specialist about healthy eating habits and factors influencing consistent exercise habits, such as barriers and common myths. Get FIT also includes before and after DXA Body Composition tests allowing each participant to see changes in fat, muscle, and bone (see Body Comp FIT).

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