On the face of it, skipping meals seems like a path to losing weight — if you don’t eat as much, you’ll drop fat. But in practise, it doesn’t work out like that. A 2015 study from Ohio State University found that skipping meals messes up your metabolism and your hormones (specifically insulin), which results in an increased likelihood of abdominal weight gain. Researchers recommended eating several small meals throughout the day as opposed to one or two big ones.
Don't get me wrong — exercising at any time is good for you. But evening activity may be particularly beneficial because many people's metabolism slows down toward the end of the day. Thirty minutes of aerobic activity before dinner increases your metabolic rate and may keep it elevated for another two or three hours, even after you've stopped moving. What that means for you: You're less likely to go back for seconds or thirds. Plus, it'll help you relax post meal so you won't be tempted by stress-induced grazing that can rack up calories, quickly.

About 65 percent of the human body is made up of water, so it's important to replenish the water you lose each day. According to a study conducted among 10,000 adults aged 18 to 64 over a three year period, drinking plenty of water and eating water-filled fruits and vegetables significantly improves your ability to lose weight fast, especially if you are overweight or obese.
After the long winter, it’s nice to have the getfit program to give me the momentum to be more active. The support of the getfit network helps me to be more mindful and more conscious, and the discounts and perks are wonderful incentives. The support does not end when you leave campus—getfit links to an array of fitness programs both on campus and in the community. Meeting new people while taking a power walk around the Charles, through the tunnels, or in after-work activities is an added bonus.
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