If you’ve been eating fast food for years, get real about your approach: You’re probably not going to stick to an organic, gluten-free, paleo overhaul for very long. "You want to change as little as possible to create calorie deficit," says Dr. Seltzer, who insists the best way to support sustainable weight loss is to incorporate small changes into existing habits. So instead of giving up your daily BLT bagels in favor of an egg-white wrap, try ordering your sandwich on a lighter English muffin. Or say you eat a snack bar every afternoon: Swap your 300-calorie bar for a 150-calorie alternative. "Your brain will feel the same way about it, so you won’t feel deprived," he says.
Now, instead of just nagging you to close rings, your Series 4 will keep an eye on when your heart rate spikes and your motion is consistent with working out. Recently, when I thought I started my Nike Run Club run, the Apple Workout app buzzed me a quarter mile in, asking me if I was running. When I confirmed, it filled in the first part of my run and activated to log the rest. As someone who's always grumbling that if a run isn't recorded it didn't happen, that interaction was nothing short of revelatory.
In other words? "Drinking makes you more likely to eat sh*t," Dr. Seltzer says, referring to drunk foods. At the same time, he stops short of asking patients to quit alcohol cold-turkey to lose weight. Plus, research suggests you don’t have to, as long as your intake is moderate—i.e., less than about a drink a day. "If you drink a glass of wine every night and notice you eat more afterward, eat less early to account for this," he says. "Or, if you’re drinking four glasses of wine a week, drink three instead so you’ll won’t feel such a big difference."
Also some research shows that the human body is primed to consume most of its calories during daylight hours. But the lifestyle is problematic for many: Because family meals and dinners with friends often are scheduled for after sunset, "people who try to stop eating after 7pm can’t do it every day for the rest of their lives," says Dr. Seltzer, who supports an alternative strategy: Eating a hearty meal at your regular dinnertime.

Get FIT involves three workouts and one luncheon seminar each week. The workouts, which are conducted in Bellmont Hall and offered throughout the day, are a balanced mix between cardiovascular and resistance training, the goal being to maximize weight loss from fat and improve daily functioning. The weekly luncheon is a one hour seminar where Get FIT participants bring their lunch and learn from a Registered Dietician and behavioral specialist about healthy eating habits and factors influencing consistent exercise habits, such as barriers and common myths. Get FIT also includes before and after DXA Body Composition tests allowing each participant to see changes in fat, muscle, and bone (see Body Comp FIT).
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