One of the most effective ways to torch calories at the gym is by incorporating HIIT workouts into your regular exercise routine. Researchers from the University of New South Wales recently discovered that women who performed three HIIT sessions per week lost roughly 7 pounds in a 15-week period, while participants in the same study who did lower intensity workouts actually gained almost 3 pounds.
The body doesn't react to all fats in the same way. Research correlates high intake of saturated fat (the kind in meat and dairy) to increased visceral fat, says Patton. On the other hand, monounsaturated fats (the kind in olive oil and avocados) and specific types of polyunsaturated fats (mainly omega-3s, found in walnuts, sunflower seeds, and fatty fish like salmon) have anti-inflammatory effects in the body, and if eaten in proper portions may do your body good. But Patton warns that eating too much fat of any kind increases your calorie intake and could lead to weight gain, so enjoy healthy fats in moderation. 
Try a diet in which you consume 2200 calories (men) or 2000 calories (women) per day. This should cause a deficit sufficient for you to lose one or two pounds per week, depending on your activity level. Some women may require lower daily calorie intake, such as 1800 or 1500 a day. Start by limiting yourself to a 2000 calorie limit per day, and lower the limit if you do not see progress.

Lean protein like fish is a great way to fight fat and boost your metabolism. But the farmed salmon you get at the local market might not be the best bet for your belly. The cold-water fish has a well-deserved reputation for packing plenty of heart-healthy omega 3 fatty acids—1,253 mg of the good stuff, and just 114 mg of inflammatory, belly-busting omega 6s. But the farmed variety—and 90 percent of what we eat today is farmed—has a very different story to tell. It packs a whopping 1,900 mg of unhealthy omega-6s.
Get FIT consists of Start FIT, Get FIT I, and Get FIT II.  Most individuals start in Get FIT I.  Start FIT is designed for those with more physical limitations.  Get FIT II is designed for those who have graduated from Get FIT I or are already physically active.  The FIT staff will help you determine if Start FIT, Get FIT I, Get FIT II is right for you.
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