Clean your house vigorously. You'd be surprised how physically taxing housework is: dusting your shelves, cleaning your toilets, doing the dishes, mowing the lawn, pulling weeds, vacuuming and sweeping, picking up the house, and cleaning the garage will definitely give you a workout. Making yourself and your family clean parts of your house on a regular basis will not only create a better environment for you to live in, but also make burning calories, staying flexible, and keeping in shape a much simpler process.

Carbohydrates are a touchy subject: while some blame them for all fat gain, it’s the type of carbs you eat that’s key. A 2011 study out of the University of Alabama found that a diet that slightly cut back on carbs, and which comprised mostly low-GI carbohydrates, lost more deep abdominal fat than those who ate a lower-fat diet. GI stands for glycemic index, a measure of how fast carbohydrates supply your body with energy: high-GI foods make you spike then crash, while low-GI foods provide a slow burn.
Even if you do meet your goal, it's nearly impossible to keep off the weight over the long term: "The amount of restriction required [to maintain that number] will make you so hungry that you’ll eat everything in sight—it’s survival instinct," Dr. Seltzer says. And since calorie restriction gradually slows your metabolism, your body will be less prepared to burn the foods you binge on, he adds. That could mean gaining more pounds than you lost in the first place.

Most people who want to lose weight have more than 12 pounds to lose. That’s why even the best weight loss drug in the world can only be an optional complement to other treatment. That’s why this piece of advice is number 18 out of 18. It may be a helpful addition for some people, but the advice higher on the list is what can make the biggest difference, by far.


To be honest, I ate to my heart's content on NY's eve right up to midnight. It was my final "give in to food temptation" before the old year ended. As a result of overeating and drinking caffeinated drinks, I was up from the stroke of midnight on NY's day until 5 a.m. During that span, I read numerous articles on lifestyle changes and short term diet challenges. All that reading led me to this site, for which I'm so thankful.
The 2003 research indicated that exercise is a top weapon against visceral fat, backed up by a 2011 study which found that aerobic exercise is basically a magic bullet. Aerobic exercise is known to most people as cardio — activities such as running and cycling, as opposed to resistance training (where you lift heavy stuff around). While participants in the study worked fairly hard (jogging 20km per week at a high intensity), the researchers said lower-intensity but longer workouts should have similar benefits.
Cortisone as an oral drug is another common culprit (e.g. Prednisolone). Cortisone often causes weight gain in the long run, especially at higher doses (e.g. more than 5 mg Prednisolone per day). Unfortunately, cortisone is often an essential medication for those who are prescribed it, but the dose should be adjusted frequently so you don’t take more than you need. Asthma inhalers and other local cortisone treatments, like creams or nose sprays, hardly affect weight.
During your workout, it serves up a ridiculous amount of data, including a heart rate monitor that's rivaled only by Apple's latest Series 4 watch. Plus you can pair your favorite Bluetooth headphones and sync with a Spotify premium account to listen to downloaded playlists right from your watch. If you want to get up and go, phone free, you can do just that.
Some antidepressant medications can cause weight gain, especially the older tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs) such as Tryptizol, Saroten, and Clomipramine; as well as newer drugs such as Remeron (Mirtazapine). Lithium (for manic-depressive disorder) often causes weight gain. The most common antidepressants known as SSRI’s (for example Citalopram and Sertraline) usually don’t impact weight significantly. More on depression
There’s one thing to like about visceral fat: It yields fairly easily to aerobic exercise. Vaporizing calories via running, biking, swimming—anything that gets your heart rate up—is an effective way to whittle your middle. In fact, one 2011 study from Duke University Medical Center, published in the American Journal of Physiology, found the sweet spot: Jogging the equivalent of 12 miles a week was even more effective in reducing visceral fat than resistance training three times per week. However, both types of exercise were beneficial when it came to belly fat, the researchers say. (Don’t have time to hit the gym? Try these fun at-home cardio workouts if you’re in a pinch.)
Brock uses his understanding of functional movement, endurance training, muscle building and the ever important balance between performance and health to help people all over the world achieve their goals and improve their quality of life. Brock was a blogger for the Canadian Running magazine iRun.ca and has appeared as a guest and co-host on many health and wellness podcasts, such as: Ben Greenfield Fitness, Primal Endurance, Endurance Planet, and The Whole Athlete. You can also check out his workplace wellness podcast at WorkplaceHero.me.

If your doctor has recommended a diet and exercise plan for a medical reason (i.e. to lower your blood pressure, to control your diabetes, anemia, etc.) you can use your UT Flex account to pay for Get FIT. You must pay with cash, check or credit card and get reimbursed. Our online store does not accept payflex cards. You must provide signed documentation from your doctor for approval. You can use the Letter of Medical Necessity Form (PDF File) to obtain a signature from your doctor. If you have additional questions, please contact Human Resources.

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