At any given time, there are dozens of weight-loss hypes in the marketplace that claim to take off 10 pounds in 10 days, or whatever. Desperation can tempt us to try anything — from "clean eating" to cutting out food groups entirely. Keep in mind: Just because an avocado-walnut-"crunchy"-kale-salad dripping in coconut oil is deemed "clean" by a so-called "expert" on your Instagram feed does not make it an unlimited food. Moral of the story? Avoid fads, eat real food, watch some Netflix, and unwind (perhaps with a glass of wine in hand). Now that's my kind of detox.

“Even after you've completed a high-intensity workout, your body continues to burn calories for several hours,” says Desi Bartlett, a certified personal trainer in Los Angeles. “Every time your heart rate goes up, it has to come back down. You actually become more fit the more times your body has to recover. With HIIT, you increase the intensity quickly then have a short recovery time, so your body has to work harder to recover multiple times. This allows you to burn more fat and calories.”
“Food is medicine,” says Clark. “Often people ask what they can do or add to achieve health and it's not about one food or even one supplement. It's about figuring out the best foods for your own body. We are all unique. We get our clients feeling well, having a stable blood sugar then we start to get to the bottom of their inflammation. Some foods cause inflammation for one person and not another!”
Have you been consistent with workouts but haven’t gotten the results you were hoping for? Your low-key resolution is to change up your workout. Commit to the same number of workouts per week, but make these workouts completely different. If you’ve been going to yoga three times a week, go to a cycling class instead. Or if you’re walking on the treadmill every day, move over to the recumbent bike instead. By sparking a change in your routine, your muscles will be forced to work differently and hopefully you’ll begin to see the results you’ve been hoping for!
×